What To Do (And Not Do) When Approaching Editors- Guest Post

Before this, I would have approached a prospective editor with chocolate. Now I know better! This is extremely information to anyone seeking editorial help/review with a manuscript, and it is also a good read if one (not to say “I”) were thinking of doing more editorial assignments. Enjoy!

authorkdrose

Today we have a fantastic guest post by Richard Held from Held Editing Services!

Hiring an editor has its benefits. An editor can make typo and grammar corrections, eliminate passive voice, alert authors about plot holes and patchy character development, and can offer advice on character and plot development, as well as assist with fact-checking and other tasks.

Some authors, however, do not know how to approach an editor.  When these clueless scribes contact an editor, the latter often finds his/her time is wasted—and time is money for an editor, especially a full-time one.

Here is what to do—and not do—when approaching an editor.

Do: Communicate clearly.

Do you think your manuscript needs a detailed proofread to eliminate lingering typos, or do you think your document needs a light copy edit to eliminate some rough grammar?  Knowing what kind of help you need before you query will help smooth the…

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